How NOT To Quit Your Job

According to an OfficeTeam survey, 86 percent of HR Managers polled stated that how an employee quits their job affects their “future career opportunities.”

Even if you were utterly miserable at your job, and are ecstatic to find something better and never come back again, you need to remain professional and mind how you leave your current company.

In this article, we will provide tips on what NOT to do when leaving a job position.

The most important thing to remember is that you will likely need a reference from your current manager at some point in time; therefore, you must leave on a good note to preserve the relationship.

When quitting a job, dont:

Quit Without Notice

Every employee should know this basic concept – provide at least a two week notice when leaving your current post.

If you truly despise your job or your boss, it may be difficult to come to work when you know you no longer have to.

However, you must do so to provide your employer with enough time to look for a suitable replacement.

If you simply do not show up one day, your boss and co-workers will need to pick up the slack.

Bad Mouth Your Boss

Most of the time when people quit, it’s not because of the job, but because of the boss.

Whether your employer was rude, a slave driver or simply absent all the time, don’t bad mouth them.

Not only will this person need to give you a job referral, you may somehow cross paths with them again in your industry, and they may decide to share the contentious way you chose to leave your current job.

Take Company Property With You

You may have absolutely loved the painting in your office or have gotten really used to working on your company’s laptop, but you mustn’t take those items with you when you leave the position.

Whether consciously or subconsciously, people tend to take company property with them when packing up their old stuff.

While taking a framed photo of your family is OK, leave the other items on your desk for which you didn’t pay for!

These also includes confidential items, such as a roster of clients or the company’s financial information.

Leave your current position gracefully and professionally not to sabotage your career during the transition!

Thanks again

Mark Williams

Head of Training and Development

(Image by Bigstockphoto)

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Mark-WilliamsMark Williams

Mark Williams is a learning and development professional, using business psychology and multiple intelligences to create fascinating and quickly-identifiable learning initiatives in the real-world business setting. Mark’s role at MTD is to ensure that our training is leading edge, and works closely with our trainers to develop the best learning experiences for all people on learning programmes. Mark designs and delivers training programmes for businesses both small and large and strives to ensure that MTD’s clients are receiving the very best training, support and services that will really make a difference to their business.

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