Managing Supplier Relationships

ID-10045480

 

Most leaders and managers will procure goods and services for their businesses or organisations. This article is aimed at those relationships where you are responsible for the selection and ongoing management of the supplier.
Learn More

Are You Prepared To Make The Decisions?

Some managers hesitate and procrastinate over decision making. This is generally because they are anxious about making the wrong decision and the possible consequences this might have. The best managers are prepared to make decisions quickly even if they are only 80% sure they are right. This is because delaying a decision can cause more problems than it solves. By acting quicker and anticipating the risks you may be able to still put the situation right. Procrastinating may leave this option unavailable. Learn More

Decision Making 101: Layoffs

I thought we’d end the week with a little exercise – perhaps one of the most thought provoking yet.

Imagine that you work for a company that, for whatever reason, had a workforce that consisted primarily of white males. Throughout the years you have managed to change the face of the workforce and the company now has a significant number of female, African American, Asian, and Hispanic workers. Learn More

Do You Have Tunnel Vision?

Last week, when we began discussing the various components of the decision making process, I mentioned that one of the attributes a manager needed to have when making decisions was tunnel vision (or, really, a lack thereof).

Think of it this way – a tunnel is very narrow. When you’re in a tunnel you have very few options – either back up or move forward to find the nearest exit. Decision making, when done with tunnel vision, is very similar. Managers with tunnel vision find that they have very few alternatives to choose from when it’s time to make the final decision. Learn More

Decision Making & Management Style

No two managers are alike. Every single manager you meet will come from a different background on both a personal and professional level. Each will bring a unique set of attributes to the table, making his or her decision making process slightly different from the next. They will all, however, bring attributes that fall into the following categories: Learn More

Decision Making Roles

As a manager you are, of course, responsible for making decisions on a number of different levels. You’ve probably already figured out that your interpersonal and information management roles involve making decisions, but you have a number of other responsibilities as well.

You have four main roles as a decision maker within your organisation. They are to act as an entrepreneur, to handle disturbances, to allocate resources, and to negotiate.

As an entrepreneur you are responsibel for finding new ideas that will enhance the way your team works. Once you’ve developed the idea you must implement it and continuously review it to ensure your strategies are sound. You’ll need to know when to make changes should they become necessary.

The handling of disturbances within your team or department are also your responsibility. Disturbances may include anything from broken equipment to scheduling conflicts or two team members not getting along. You need to make decisions that will stop or avoid anything that will decrease your team’s productivity.

When your team or department receives new resources they’ll come to you first. It’s your job to decide who needs those resources and allocate them properly. These may include access to training, funding for new equipment, and evens upplies.

Last, but certainly not least, you are a negotiator. You are responsible for working with suppliers, other management members, and your employees to make agreements that will enhance your performance.

Managers are obviously bestowed with a significant amount of authority and if you find yourself in a new management position you’ll have to be careful not to abuse that position. The more skilled you are at using your decision making skills for good the more productive, efficient, and successful your team will be.

Thanks again,

Sean

Sean McPheat

Managing Director

http://www.mtdtraining.com

Management Blog Call To Action

Management Share Blog Button

Decision Making & Goal Setting

One of the most important parts of the decision making process is proper planning and goal setting. Goals are incredibly important to the success of any organisation, and for good reason. They serve four main purposes:

  1. Goals provide direction – whether for individuals, teams, or an entire organisation. Why does your company exist if not to meet some sort of goal? Do you want to make sales, increase revenues, or build your client list.
  2. Setting goals leads to proper planning which leads to meeting goals and setting new ones. It sounds silly, but if you have a goal you should strive to meet it. If you meet your goals you should be prepared to move on to the next one.
  3. Goals tend to motivate people to work harder. They’re even better at motivating people if they know they will be rewarded for meeting their goals.
  4. Setting goals will allow you and your organisation to evaluate your processes. If you set a goal that you are unable to meet you’ll need to find out why it was unattainable. This process will give you the knowledge necessary to make changes to your processes and procedures.

We’re going to spend some time over the next week discussing decision making, planning, and goal setting. We’ll look at different aspects of each, how they relate to each other, and how you can use these skills to improve productivity in the workplace.

Thanks again,

Sean

Sean McPheat

Managing Director

http://www.mtdtraining.com

Management Blog Call To Action

Management Share Blog Button