How to Prevent Employee Burnout

Alright – I have one more thing to say about employee burnout and then we’ll put the subject away for a little while. You know the signs of burnout, what causes burnout, and how to remedy the situation.

That’s all well and good but the real question is whether or not you are capable of preventing employee burnout.

One of the best ways to prevent employee burnout is to recognize the signs and stop the employee from heading down that path before he actually reaches the state of burnout. But what does this really entail?

For starters, make sure you have clarified your employee’s job description. In some cases an employee may actually be doing too much because he feels he or she is supposed to be doing tasks that could easily be passed on to someone else. In other cases the job description that has been set forth may have been too lofty and you may need to make some changes internally in order to redistribute the workload.

In some cases burnout is caused by boredom and a lack of work. If this is the case, add additional duties to your employee’s job description. Make sure they’re challenging while remaining within that employee’s skillset. You may just be surprised to find you’ve been underutilizing someone with a special skillset you had yet to discover.

While most managers don’t want to give up good employees, it’s important to take a step back and consider whether or not it may be more beneficial to the employee in question to accept a job transfer. Perhaps a different team, department, or job function would allow him to continue working while giving him the change he needs to stop feeling burnt out. Don’t be offended if an employee does NOT want to transfer, though. This simply means he likes his job (and you) enough to find another alternative.

“If at first you don’t succeed, try try again.” You may have to offer up several solutions before finding one that helps prevent the employee in question from burning out. In some cases you may end up asking your employee to take some time off so that he can relax and regroup. It’s better to have this happen before he’s completely burnt out than to wait until he’s no longer functional or has made himself ill.

Don’t forget that the stress associated with burnout can be very serious. If none of these options work, or if you suspect there is another underlying cause, it may be best for you or your employees to seek the advice of a health care provider. Proper stress management is the key to avoiding burnout altogether.

Thanks again,

Sean

Sean McPheat

Managing Director

http://www.mtdtraining.com

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How to Remedy Employee Burnout

So you’ve identified an employee who seems to be on the path to burnout.

What are you doing to do about it?

The simplest answer is to make sure he or she gets a break. Most organisations feel as though making sure their employees are taking their vacation or paid time off every year is enough, but is it really?

Put yourself in the shoes of your employee. Say you have a reduced workforce because of layoffs and an inabiltity to hire more help. Your desk is covered in work because you have to pick up some of the slack. Everyone is just as busy as you are, so when you leave for vacation very little of your work gets reassigned in your absence.

Upon your return to work you are faced with your regular workload PLUS the work that sat while you were away.

That doesn’t sound very relaxing, does it?

I’ve known people who have refused to take vacation simply because they know how terrible their desks will look upon their return.

Finding a remedy for employee burnout means doing a bit more than simply forcing an employee to take a vacation. It means helping him to find ways to more efficiently streamline his workflow or finding ways to redistribute work amongst your entire team. It means making sure everyone gets along, ensuring that everyone is skilled enough to do the work they’ve been assigned, and making sure everyone feels appreciated.

As a manager, can you identify ways in which you can alter your team’s workflow in order to prevent burnout?

Thanks again,

Sean

Sean McPheat

Managing Director

http://www.mtdtraining.com

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The Causes of Employee Burnout

Yesterday we went over some of the signs of employee burnout so today I’d like to continue by talking about some of the actual causes.

Employee burnout can happen to anyone regardless of age, gender, ethnicity and occupation. Studies do show that people who work with the public (such as customer service professionals) are more likely than others to experience burnout. People who constantly feel as though they work too hard for too little money are more likely to experience burnout as well.

The causes of burnout vary from person to person but I found it interesting that while it is sometimes caused by the workplace, some people may lead themselves down that path on their own. Here are some of the main causes:

  • Some people have unrealistic goals. They may set them for themselves or their managers and coworkers may set them.
  • People who feel as if they have no control over their situations often burn out. They often have no say when it comes to setting their work hours or placing limits on the amount of work they can complete in a day.
  • Jobs that conflict with an individual’s personal morals or ethics may cause burnout.
  • Individuals who are bored by their work are easily burnt out.
  • Workers who aren’t given proper resources or who are not given clear instructions when handed a project often become burnt out.
  • Working with a team of people who are grumpy, rude, bullying, or controlling will cause burnout.

There are dozens of reasons an employee might become burnt out. Some are related to work alone while others are a combination of work and personal issues. As a manager it is your job to recognise the causes and make changes before it’s too late.

Thanks again,

Sean

Sean McPheat

Managing Director

http://www.mtdtraining.com

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Are Your Employees Burning Out?

Over the next few days we’re going to take a close look at some issues regarding workplace safety. One of the first, and perhaps most important to the success of your team, is whether or not your employees are burning out.

Burnout is really a sophisticated term used to describe a psychological state of mind. It encompasses feelings of exhaustion experienced over an extended period of time and, subsequently, a loss of interest in work. Some people experience burnout when the workload is so demanding they feel as though they can no longer keep up.

So how do people become burnt out? Employees who continuously give everything they have without taking a proper break to recover (in both mind and body) usually begin to exhibit symptoms.

But here’s the catch.

Burnout isn’t instant. People don’t suddenly wake up in the morning and claim to be burnt out. It creeps up on them over a period of time and, if you’re watching, you’ll be able to recognize the warning signs and make some changes before your employees become sick or start making critical errors.

So what are some of the signs of burnout?

  • Feeling bored even though you have plenty to do.
  • Feeling unmotivated.
  • Persistent negative thought patterns.
  • Feelings of irritability, frustration, and apathy.
  • Wanting to isolate one’s self from peers.
  • Emotional exhaustion or depression.

These are, of course, only a handful of the signs of burnout in the workplace. Keep your eyes peeled and you’ll be able to tell if your employees are becoming burnt out by the way they act. Take action before it’s too late!

Thanks again,

Sean

Sean McPheat

Managing Director

http://www.mtdtraining.com

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