3 Quick Tips On Keeping Employees Safe At Work

As a manager, your role is not only make sure the workload gets completed, but also to keep your employees safe.

When you are employing staff, you are responsible for their well being while they are at work. Learn More

5 Tips To Ensure That Your Employees Are Safe In The Workplace

In the past we’ve talked about workplace safety but from the standpoint of employee burnout and, more recently, the importance of having a plan if your organisation is affected by a pandemic like the H1N1 virus. Today, though, I’d like to take a step back and look at workplace safety from a more general viewpoint.

You may think that the fact you work in an office exempts you from workplace safety. You are, after all, simply sitting at a desk all day, right? Wrong. Employees trip and fall, burn themselves in the kitchen, and even suffer from health issues while at work. So what can you do to ensure you workplace is safe for everyone all of the time?

5. Keep Your Work Areas Clean

Whether you work in an office or in a warehouse it’s important to always keep your work area clean. Strewn garbage, unattended wires, and boxes piled floor to ceiling can create dangerous hazards for those who need to move around them.

4. Give Clear Instructions

Workplace safety is, as a manager, partly your responsibility. If you don’t give your employees clear instructions about what they need to do they may do the wrong thing, or put together an incorrect set of pieces of information – causing danger to themselves and others.

3. Show You Care

So you’re running on a deadline but the printer is smoking or an important machine is making a terrible grinding noise. Do you push through and hope the machines last or do you shut them down to avoid a potential safety hazard? Hopefully you show your employees that you care about them more than deadlines by shutting the machines down.

2. Ensure Everyone is Properly Trained

One of the best ways to avoid an accident is to ensure everyone on your team is properly trained. A new or inexperienced employee can easily make a mistake that a seasoned veteran might take for granted. Offer the right amount of training and then make sure new employees are supervised properly until they gain enough experience to ensure total safety.

1. Ditch Workplace Safety Incentives

Workplace safety incentives are some of the silliest things I’ve ever seen. Offering employees incentives to be safe is like saying you expect them to do stupid things and need to bribe them not to. I’m not saying you should punish them for being unsafe but I don’t think they should behonored for doing what they should be doing naturally to begin with.

Are you ready to start the week on a safe note? Good luck!

Thanks again,

Sean

Sean McPheat

Managing Director

http://www.mtdtraining.com

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Workplace Safety, the Swine Flu, and You

I’m sure by now you’ve all heard of the swine flu. This newest viral strain has infected up to 70 individuals in Mexico, New Zealand, and the United States. While the World Health Organization is taking precautions to contain the virus, there are still fears that the swine flu will turn into a global pandemic.

So what does this mean to you as an employer?

First, it means you need to have a contingency plan. You really should have one already, but if you don’t it’s time to put one together. What offsite locations, work at home programs, and other resources will you implement to keep your operations functioning if for some reason you are unable to leave your home?

Next you need to make plans for dealing with changes in the economy. Pandemic waves will cause employee absenteeism and may mean that supplies may or may not arrive at your workplace on time – if at all. Are you in a business that deals in medical products? Chances are you’ll see an increase in business if there is a pandemic outbreak.

Finally, what procedures will you implement within the workplace ot keep everyone safe? Will you suspend your “sick-day” policies to ensure that people don’t lose their jobs if they have to stay home due to illness – either their own or that of a child? Will you encourage employees to stay at home for the full 7 days recommended by the World Health Organization and the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the US). Will you ensure that there are extra sanitizing hand gels on site for everyone to use frequently?

I don’t want to cause alarm but planning in advance is crucial to the success of your business. Surviving a pandemic isn’t just about making sure your business stays afloat, but it is about making sure your employees know you care about and support them as well.

Do you have a plan?

Thanks again,

Sean

Sean McPheat

Managing Director

http://www.mtdtraining.com

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How to Prevent Employee Burnout

Alright – I have one more thing to say about employee burnout and then we’ll put the subject away for a little while. You know the signs of burnout, what causes burnout, and how to remedy the situation.

That’s all well and good but the real question is whether or not you are capable of preventing employee burnout.

One of the best ways to prevent employee burnout is to recognize the signs and stop the employee from heading down that path before he actually reaches the state of burnout. But what does this really entail?

For starters, make sure you have clarified your employee’s job description. In some cases an employee may actually be doing too much because he feels he or she is supposed to be doing tasks that could easily be passed on to someone else. In other cases the job description that has been set forth may have been too lofty and you may need to make some changes internally in order to redistribute the workload.

In some cases burnout is caused by boredom and a lack of work. If this is the case, add additional duties to your employee’s job description. Make sure they’re challenging while remaining within that employee’s skillset. You may just be surprised to find you’ve been underutilizing someone with a special skillset you had yet to discover.

While most managers don’t want to give up good employees, it’s important to take a step back and consider whether or not it may be more beneficial to the employee in question to accept a job transfer. Perhaps a different team, department, or job function would allow him to continue working while giving him the change he needs to stop feeling burnt out. Don’t be offended if an employee does NOT want to transfer, though. This simply means he likes his job (and you) enough to find another alternative.

“If at first you don’t succeed, try try again.” You may have to offer up several solutions before finding one that helps prevent the employee in question from burning out. In some cases you may end up asking your employee to take some time off so that he can relax and regroup. It’s better to have this happen before he’s completely burnt out than to wait until he’s no longer functional or has made himself ill.

Don’t forget that the stress associated with burnout can be very serious. If none of these options work, or if you suspect there is another underlying cause, it may be best for you or your employees to seek the advice of a health care provider. Proper stress management is the key to avoiding burnout altogether.

Thanks again,

Sean

Sean McPheat

Managing Director

http://www.mtdtraining.com

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The Causes of Employee Burnout

Yesterday we went over some of the signs of employee burnout so today I’d like to continue by talking about some of the actual causes.

Employee burnout can happen to anyone regardless of age, gender, ethnicity and occupation. Studies do show that people who work with the public (such as customer service professionals) are more likely than others to experience burnout. People who constantly feel as though they work too hard for too little money are more likely to experience burnout as well.

The causes of burnout vary from person to person but I found it interesting that while it is sometimes caused by the workplace, some people may lead themselves down that path on their own. Here are some of the main causes:

  • Some people have unrealistic goals. They may set them for themselves or their managers and coworkers may set them.
  • People who feel as if they have no control over their situations often burn out. They often have no say when it comes to setting their work hours or placing limits on the amount of work they can complete in a day.
  • Jobs that conflict with an individual’s personal morals or ethics may cause burnout.
  • Individuals who are bored by their work are easily burnt out.
  • Workers who aren’t given proper resources or who are not given clear instructions when handed a project often become burnt out.
  • Working with a team of people who are grumpy, rude, bullying, or controlling will cause burnout.

There are dozens of reasons an employee might become burnt out. Some are related to work alone while others are a combination of work and personal issues. As a manager it is your job to recognise the causes and make changes before it’s too late.

Thanks again,

Sean

Sean McPheat

Managing Director

http://www.mtdtraining.com

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