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The Buying Facilitation Method

Sharon Drew Morgen is perhaps one of the most well known advocates for selling techniques in today’s society. Her concepts have earned her wide recognition both in Europe and the United States and has done a lot to change the way salesmen think about buying and selling.

Morgen’s theory is known as Buying Facilitation (R). Her book talks, in short, about why buyers refuse to buy and why sellers aren’t good at selling. She then outlines what you need to do in order to manage the chaos associated with the buying and selling process.

A few examples include:

  • A salesman helping the buyer understand their own systems and why they need to change.
  • A salesman helping a buyer understand that not all change results in chaos.
  • The seller has to help the buyer see the larger (macro) viewpoint instead of only the smaller, immediate picture. If he can do this, he’ll be able to show the buyer that the new system or product is worth using despite the initial hardship associated with implementing a change.
  • The seller is able to act as an adviser to the buyer, helping him to meet his exact goals as they apply to buying.

These are just a few examples of the items detailed in Morgen’s Buying Facilitation(R) Method. Sadly, she doesn’t make much of her work available to the public so in this instance I’d have to recommend you take a look at her book, Buying Facilitation, or visit Sharon Drew Morgen’s website. If you’re in sales, or working as a sales manager, I’m pretty sure you’ll find it to be an easy and useful read.

Thanks again,

Sean

Sean McPheat

Managing Director

MTD Training | Management Blog | Image courtesy of Big Stock Photo

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Selling with Confidence

As a manager you are responsible for not only overseeing your team but for ensuring they have the skills necessary to do their jobs. In some cases, this means making sure your sales associates have the confidence necessary to make a sale.

Seriously. Imagine walking into a store and asking a sales associate for help. You ask a question and he gives you a very short, minimal answer. One that begs you to ask a dozen additional questions. You won’t, however, because he seems anxious to get away from you or continues to give you short, simple answers.

Now imagine walking into a store and having a sales associate approach you before you can even ask for help. Every question you ask is met with a full answer and gives you the impression that the associate knows quite a bit about his product and his job. He shows you all of the product features and explains how they can work for you.

Which associate will you be making your purchase with? The second, I’m sure.

Why?

Because the second associate did two things. He acted confident about his knowledge and his product and he made you confident in his knowledge and product at the same time. He has gained your trust and you truly believe that the product you are preparing to purchase will do every single thing he claims it will.

Now – that’s a big deal.

Take some time out of your busy schedule and survey your sales team, whether you’re in retail or in some other sort of outside sales department. What do your sales associates say about your company and products, in their attitudes, when they open their mouths? Are they trustworthy or are they losing business because they’re unsure of themselves?

It may be time to have a refresher course when it comes to your company’s products or services – or to find a way to help those who seem to be struggling become more confident in themselves.

Good luck!

Thanks again,

Sean

Sean McPheat

Managing Director

MTD Training | Management Blog | Image courtesy of Big Stock Photo

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Using the Holidays to Your Advantage

The holidays are a great time of year, especially if you are in sales.

Yes, you heard me correctly. I refuse to believe that the holiday season is an acceptable excuse for anyone – whether in customer service, management, or sales – to slack off. You should be just as productive as ever, even if that means changing your angle of attack. What do I mean? Learn More

telephone

How Clear are Your Voicemail Messages?

telephoneIt doesn’t matter if you work in customer service, as a salesperson, or as a manager for either team. Leaving an effective voicemail is essential to your success in the workplace. So what exactly is a successful voicemail? Learn More

Have You Fired a Customer Lately?

As a salesperson, or sales team leader, it is important that you recognize exactly when a customer has crossed the line from profitable to draining. While it is important, from a customer service aspect, for each customer to feel as though he’s your largest client, the truth is that you should be spending most of your time attempting to retain the clients who are the most likely to make repeat purchases. Otherwise, you’re simply spinning your wheels and your book of business will never grow. Learn More

thumbs down

Avoiding Negativity in the Workplace

thumbs downWhat’s one of the best ways to keep your team motivated? Help them avoid negativity in the workplace, of course. Learn More

The Corporate Life Cycle Model

A very respected business theoriest known as Dr. Ichak Adizes outlined a very interesting theory regarding the life cycle corporations go through. Formally known as the Corporate Life Cycle Model, the theory contains 10 distinct stages each business must pass through as it moves from a simple idea, through realization, and to its ultimate end.

Let’s first look at the 10 stages of the Corporate Life Cycle Model. They are as follows:

  1. Courtship is the period during which you have an idea you are toying with in your head. You alk about development, create business plans, look for funding, etc.
  2. Infancy describes the very first stages of a business, immediately after the official public launch.
  3. The go-go stage occurs when a business is still relatively new. This stage tends to be very busy and in some cases is very chaotic.
  4. A business is in its adolescent stages when it begins to define itself but still experiences growth.
  5. The prime stage of any business model occurs when it is at it’s most profitable and competitive point.
  6. A business is in the stability stage when it is starting to lose its edge but is still considered popular and profitable.
  7. Aristrocracy occurs as a business begins to lose more of its edge and market share but still has a strong presence; it can’t keep up with new technologies.
  8. Recrimination occurs when people begin to have doubts about the future success of a business and begin to feel threatened. They lose sight of their original goals.
  9. A business will turn into a bureaucracy when the administration begins thinking only of themselves. At this point, you’ll notice many of the investors looking elsewhere and key players in the organization leaving for other opportunities.
  10. Finally, a business will just die off. It will be sold to another company for the sake of a client base, file for bankruptcy, or simply close.

The trick, in any business, is to keep a business in the early and middle stages for as long as possible. This means using innovative marketing strategies to come up with new products and new marketing techniques in order to stay as competitive as possible for as long as possible. You and your team should always be looking forward, wondering what you can do next to make things better. If you fall into a rut, you’ll only push yourselves further towards the end of your careers.

Thanks again,

Sean

Sean McPheat

Managing Director

MTD Training | Management Blog | Image courtesy of Big Stock Photo

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Adams Equity Theory

The Equity Theory on job motivation, created by a psychologist known as John Stacey Adams, has been circulating since 1963. They theory talks about how employees who feel they are being treated fairly are likely to do more or better work than those who do not.

Treat me like an equal, I’ll work like an equal; treat me in an inferior manner, I will work in an inferior manner. Learn More