The Management Blog

Tips & advice to help you improve your performance

 

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How can we define ethics in management?

The Four Principles of Ethical Management

Ethics , Business Team Ethics , Business Ethics Integrity Honest As a manager you’re going to find yourself in a position where you are required to regularly make decisions.

While you may, at times, feel as though you are guided by your own morals and beliefs, it is very important for you to remember to put your personal beliefs aside so that you can look at each situation objectively and make the most ethical decisions possible.

So how can you achieve this? 

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TEAM building

Things You SHOULDN’T Do When Team Building

TEAM buildingT – Together

E – Everyone

A – Achieves

M – More

No one can doubt the importance of a good team, not in sports, not in marriage and certainly not in the office.

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Micromanaging word breaking

Is It Ever OK To Be A Micromanager?

Micromanaging word breakingMicromanagers have a bad rep in today’s corporate culture.

Employees complain when their boss looks over their shoulders all the time, or don’t trust them to make their own decisions. Learn More

Do You Really Want to be a Manager?

Management, to be honest, isn’t easy. Sure, there are pros and cons to becoming a manager but the reality of the situation is that you need to jump on the management path not only because someone thinks you’d be good at it, or because you think you’ll make more money, but because you really want to be a leader.

Any other reason is unacceptable and, in the end, if you’re not willing to be a leader you’re going to find yourself very frustrated with your career path. Let’s take a look at some of the negative and positive aspects of a career in management.

First, we’ll list some of the drawbacks:

  • You won’t be able to develop as many close friendships with your team members because doing so will cloud your ability to make objective supervisory decisions. You may begin to feel lonely.
  • You’ll receive very little immediate feedback about how you’re doing with your work. Most of your goals will be long-term. As such, you may feel unsure of yourself.
  • Managers often have to sign legal documents, including employment contracts or contracts with customers and vendors. This means you can, on some level, be held legally liable if there is a problem.
  • Management positions are competitive. There are more team members than there are managers -always. And there are always more people looking to move up than there are spots available. You may feel some tension as others vie for your job – or for those similar to yours.

There are, of course, plenty of positive aspects to management:

  • Your status as a manager may earn you some sort of prestige – especially if people believe your title sounds powerful.
  • Managers sometimes feel as though they have some sort of power. They do, on some levels, but it is important to remember that even managers have work delegated to them before they can delegate it to others.
  • Managers, in most cases, receive better pay than those beneath them. There are instances in which this is not true. For example, some companies pay based on the value of your contributions. Who do you think gets paid more – a nuclear chemist or the guy who “manages” the plan in which he works. My guess is that the nuclear chemist is actually making a more valuable or important contribution to the overall goals of the organisation.

It’s up to you to weigh the pros and cons of management. If moving up the corporate ladder is something you’ve always dreamed of, then go for it. If not, do you really want to add that type of stress to your life?

Thanks again,

Sean

Sean McPheat

Managing Director

MTD Training   | Image courtesy of Big Stock Photo

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Nerd

The Tone of Your Voice

nerdThe other day I was reading a sales-related article but the point really translates back to any aspect of business – especially if you are a manager. The article talked about your voice and, more specifically, the tone of your voice. Learn More

Tips for Retaining Employees – Part 2

The other day we started to discuss a few of the things you can do, as a manager, to retain your good employees. Today I’d like to add 5 more tips to the list. Combine them all, using your own personal management style, and before you know it you’ll see your employee relationships improving.

  • Listen to your employees. Your team members, if you listen to them, have valuable ideas and most of them want to contribute to the process. Listen to what they have to say and make sure they know the lines of communication are always open.
  • Help them find opportunities for growth. No one wants to feel as though he or she is stuck in a dead end job for a lifetime and you, as a manager, can’t expect them to be happy in the same position forever. Help your employees identify opportunities for growth, both short-term and long. Employees working towards goals are always happier.
  • Encourage flexibility. I’m not saying you have to adjust their schedules every other day and make ridiculous concessions but you can find ways to encourage them to find balance between their work and persona lives without decreasing productivity. This means not being rude when they’re really sick or when they need to take care of their children.
  • Encourage personal wellness. Healthy employees are happy employees and stress is certainly not healthy. Surprise them with special breaks, give them gift certificates to their favorite restaurants or spas as an acknowledgment of their loyalty, or have a yoga instructor come in for a morning class. They’ll appreciate the break from the regular routine.
  • Finally, please remember to say THANK YOU to the people who work for you. Whether they’re permanent employees or independent contractors, everyone appreciates knowing you recognize, acknowledge, and appreciate the things they do. Nothing else you do will matter if you never utter those two simple words.

Thanks again,

Sean

Sean McPheat

Managing Director

MTD Training   | Image courtesy of Big Stock Photo

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learn

What Does Coaching Offer Employees?

learnYou may be ready and willing to start a coaching program with each of your employees. The trick to building a successful coaching relationship relies on three things: you ability to know what you need to encourage your employees to learn, your ability to recognize what new behaviours your employees should be picking up, and your ability to understand exactly what benefits coaching has.
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telephone

How Clear are Your Voicemail Messages?

telephoneIt doesn’t matter if you work in customer service, as a salesperson, or as a manager for either team. Leaving an effective voicemail is essential to your success in the workplace. So what exactly is a successful voicemail? Learn More

Why Managers Fail

The other day we talked about the ways in which managers are judged and over the past few weeks we have discussed some of the skills a manager really needs to have in order to be successful. There is certainly a lengthy list of criteria but even with this knowledge some managers (or, to be fair, management teams) fail. So why is this?

The first problem is that some managers never take the time to learn about the expectations their superiors have of them. They either just don’t know or they’re afraid to ask, making it difficult for them to complete their jobs in a manner that makes those in upper management happy.

The second problem is the lack of decision making skills. Let’s face it – life is full of choices. As a manager you need to be able to sort through those choices, determine which is best, and stick to your guns despite the potential grumblings of your subordinates. If you can’t make tough decisions for your department, who will? Without a manager making decisions, nothing would ever get done!

Which brings me to my next point – relationships. A good manager should be able to build strong working relationships with his peers and subordinates. If you can’t work together with the people on your teams you’ll never get anything done because even if you do make a quality decision no one will a) respect it or b) listen at all.

The final problem I’d like to address today is a lack of political savvy. Let’s face it, as a manager you do not have the luxury of being able to say whatever you want, when you want, regardless of your audience. You must learn how to be politically correct when you speak – tailoring your word choice and delivery to your audience. Your peers, for example, may appreciate a good joke but your subordinates may not take you seriously and upper management may view your behaviour as inappropriate.

So where do you fall in the grand scheme of things. Are you on the path to success or failure? If you’re on the latter path, can you turn things around before it’s too late?

Thanks again,

Sean

Sean McPheat

Managing Director

MTD Training   | Image courtesy of Big Stock Photo

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The 10 Main Management Roles

According to a man by the name of Mintzberg, the roles or expectations placed upon managers can be broken down into three main categories incorporating ten different roles. As a manager you’ll find that you wear a number of hats at any given time but it is (fortunately) very unlikely that you would be responsible for all 10 at the same time but from time to time you will find yourself juggling at least a few.

Over the coming days we’ll spend some time reviewing the different roles managers are responsible for undertaking. I’d like to start today by mapping them out a bit.

The three main categories the 10 management roles fall into include interpersonal, informational, and decision making. These categories should sound familiar to you buy now. Within each category you’ll find the following roles defined:

Interpersonal:

  • Figureheads
  • Leaders
  • Liasons

Informational:

  • Monitor
  • Disseminator
  • Spokesperson

Decision Making:

  • Entrepreneur
  • Disturbance handler
  • Resource Allocator
  • Negotiator

As you can see, a manager has quite a number of responsibilities. We don’t usually think about our roles in such a complex manner until we see a list of tasks in front of us. Does the list seem a bit daunting? It shouldn’t. You’ve got the training you need to be in your position and can now work towards furthering your expertise.

Thanks again,

Sean

Sean McPheat

Managing Director

MTD Training   | Image courtesy of Big Stock Photo

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Is Your Organisation Successful?

Success is about much more than money. Success is about having an organisation that people love and want to work with – and want to work for. A successful organisation is one in which employees are happy, goals are achieved, and the future is bright.

There are four main factors that indicate the success of an organisation. They include:

  • Happiness – Here you have to consider whether or not everyone is happy within the organisation. Are your employees happy to come to work every day? Do your customers enjoy working with your employees?
  • Achievement – Has your organisation found solutions to the real problems it aims to solve? Have you created plans to achieve those goals?
  • Significance – Do people find your products and services valuable? Do they remember you when they need the type of product or service you offer?
  • Legacy – Is everyone who works for your organisation invested in continuing your high levels of innovation, customer service, and high quality development?

Running a successful organisation doesn’t need to be a difficult task. The key is making sure everyone is happy with your products and the way they are delivered. This doesn’t mean compromising to a fault (allowing employees and customers to dictate everything you do) but it does mean allowing the use of innovative ideas and thought processes to find the most effective ways to solve the problems at hand.

Are you part of a truly successful organisation? Are you merely profiting, or are you completely happy with your work and your prospects for the future?

Thanks again,

Sean

Sean McPheat

Managing Director

MTD Training   | Image courtesy of Big Stock Photo

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The PACT Customer Service Model

Now that you’ve had a chance to determine whether or not your customer service team members have the skills necessary to get the job done, let’s take a look at a model you can follow while training and monitoring your group.

The PACT customers service model was designed to ensure that all major aspects of the customer service process are covered with every transactions. The model itself is as follows:

  • P – Process
  • A – Attitude
  • C – Communication
  • T – Time

In short, you are responsible for making sure that your customer service team members know exactly what process they are to follow from the beginning of a transaction straight through to the end and they should have a positive attitude throughout the entire experience. They should be able to clearly and effectively communicate with not only your client but with other internal teams who may play a role in completing the job as well. Finally, they should have a good sense of time management – getting the job done within a reasonable amount of time and reporting back to the client as soon as possible.

Does your customer service team follow the PACT model? If not, can you make a few simple tweaks to get them back on track? You’ll be surprised at the increased customer service satisfaction levels you may achieve by doing so.

Thanks again,

Sean

Sean McPheat

Managing Director

MTD Training   | Image courtesy of Big Stock Photo

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